Fri. Nov 27th, 2020

PRELISTENING: Amorphis – Queen of Time (Musicalypse Archive)

AMORPHIS have been featured on our site on numerous occasions before, but February 24th, 2018, was a very special day to write about, as Musicalypse had been invited to the listening session of the Finnish metal veterans’ 13th studio album, “Queen of Time.” The preceding record, Under the Red Cloud (2015), had been well-received by all of us, so naturally we were excited to hear where the band would go musically on its successor.

Scroll down to read in Finnish.

Be sure to check out our interview with Tomi Koivusaari and Olli-Pekka Laine!

We arrived at Sonic Pump Studios a dozen or so minutes before the scheduled 15:00 beginning. Having admired the gold discs and framed photos on the walls and caffeinating ourselves sufficiently, we sat down in the room where the album playback was to take place. The event began with lead guitarist Esa Holopainen and producer Jens Bogren giving a little introductory speech. Bogren teased Holopainen for not looking excited enough – “I am excited, but I’m Finnish!” the guitarist said in his own defense. Bogren also proclaimed that we would see a lot of names in the credits once the album comes out, as they had worked with musicians from Turkey, an Israeli choir, as well as “a drunk Pakistani flutist.” Finally, the long-awaited moment arrived and the “play” button was pressed.

A track-by-track breakdown based on my notes follows below:

1. “The Bee”

A synth intro accompanied by ethereal female vocals leads us into the world of “Queen of Time.” The delayed guitar riff reminds me a bit of “The Way,” but the backing instrumentation is much more intense here. The growled oriental verses are typical heavy AMORPHIS, but there’s also some very gentle singing from Tomi Joutsen in the song. Nice start!

2. “Message in the Amber”

THE POLICE wrote “Message in a Bottle,” but AMORPHIS relies on amber instead. The folky riff and the calm verses where Joutsen sings in two octaves lead me to believe that this song might even become a single like previous track #2s, such as “House of Sleep” and “Silver Bride,” but suddenly the growled chorus kicks in and I’m proved utterly wrong. The song takes unexpected turns, but that’s a positive thing.

3. “Daughter of Hate”

Prog time! Over the course of just one song, AMORPHIS offers us a 7/8 riff, a chorus with fierce black metal vocals, a saxophone solo, and a warm, jammy middle section where lyricist Pekka Kainulainen recites a poem in Finnish, among other things – to say there’s a lot going on here would be an understatement. A very likely favorite for myself, and perhaps for many other fans as well.

4. “The Golden Elk”

Tinkling synths and wordless female vocals open the tune, which also boasts a catchy riff and a big chorus. In the middle there are strings building up the drama, as well as a solo played on an exotic string instrument. As an extra curiosity, the album title is namedropped a few times in the lyrics. I have a feeling this is going to be another popular song among listeners.

5. “Wrong Direction”

The riff at the beginning recalls “Reformation” from 2011’s “The Beginning of Times” and there are some big percussions accentuating the sound. “I should’ve understood / I should’ve seen it coming,” Joutsen sings in the infectious chorus, and in the fascinating middle section his voice has been run through a Vocoder or a similar robotic effect. There’s only a bit of growling at the end, and the massive outro reminds me of “Nemo” by NIGHTWISH. Mark my words: this will be a single!

6. “Heart of the Giant”

A fragile guitar melody gives off a feeling of lonely melancholy, before giving way to a riff with a pace that makes me think of “School’s Out” by Alice Cooper; that is, until the drums come in and I realize I’ve been hearing the rhythm wrong in my head. What makes this song stand out is the chorus, where Joutsen growls in a very rhythmic, punishing manner, and at the end he’s backed by a choir to drive the point home even more emphatically. I could see this becoming a setlist staple!

7. “We Accursed”

There’s a bit of an “Escape” vibe on this one, and to be honest, it comes across as a bit of a filler, at least in comparison with the previous songs. I feel like more clean singing would fit this kind of tune better, as it’s not that dark or intense. That said, there’s an intricate folk riff that recurs multiple times in the latter half, and Santeri Kallio‘s impressive keyboard solo is something to look out for as well.

8. “Grain of Sand”

The song starts off with sitar and a guitar melody that reminds me of Finnish rautalanka music, but that doesn’t last long, as the rest of the track includes some of the most pummeling riffs on the whole album. The interesting chorus includes a trade-off between clean and growled vocals, which makes me wonder if there’s a Joutsen/Koivusaari duet to be expected in case it gets played live.

9. “Amongst Stars”

Speaking of duets, this is one, between Joutsen and Anneke van Giersbergen herself. When a singer as prolific as her makes lots of guest appearances, the danger of inflation is always present, but luckily the results speak for themselves, as this may just be the highlight of the entire album. Musically, this feels a bit brighter than most of the other songs, and the final climax is particularly splendid.

10. “Pyres on the Coast”

Tomi Joutsen‘s growls in the first verse are some of the grittiest and harshest he’s ever let out – possibly something he learned from the HALLATAR sessions? There’s a lot of variety in this song, which is probably why it didn’t totally manage to click with me yet, but the big ending riff, emphasized by an orchestra and church organ, is an apt conclusion for the album in all its grandness.

After a little break, we got to hear the bonus tracks as well:

11. “As Mountains Crumble”

Compared to the main album, this track has a more relaxed and sparse ’70s vibe: waltz beat, harmonized guitars, clean strumming, Hammond organ… an enjoyable song, but it’s easy to see why it ended up on the cutting room floor.

12. “Brother and Sister”

The delay guitars give the verses an “Alone”/”Sky Is Mine” feel, the chorus is catchy, and Holopainen‘s guitar solo is brilliant. A good tune, just like the previous one, but being rather straightforward and more in line with earlier Joutsen-era albums, I totally get why it didn’t fit in either.

My first impression was very positive, and I actually got a bit of a “The Beginning of Times” vibe, though not as much from the music itself (although I did namedrop a few tracks from that record above) as the approach of the album. “TBoT” aimed for cinematic and epic sounds with songs like “Crack in a Stone” and it also featured symphonic keyboards, female vocals, and various extra instruments however, on “Queen of Time,” the epic elements have been pushed boldly to the foreground and the result is more focused, which makes the album feels like a significant step forward in the band’s evolution. The instantly recognizable AMORPHIS recipe is still in use, but it’s been spiced up quite a bit.

It’s impossible to tell how “Queen of Time” stacks up against the rest of the AMORPHIS discography based on just one listen, as it’s by far the most challenging and least accessible album of the Joutsen era. If there’s one AMORPHIS record that requires time to sink in properly, it’s this one – as Bogren warned us beforehand, there’s a lot to digest. There are both clean and growling vocals, and lots of layers in every song, as well as few simplistic tunes or immediate hits to be found; however, further listens will surely be rewarding and unveil a lot of previously missed details. In any case, it’s evident that the boost that Bogren gave the band on Under the Red Cloud wasn’t just a flash in the pan, as their collaboration continues to be fruitful!

Report by Wille Karttunen, photos by Miia Collander
Musicalypse, 2018
OV: 17777 / 3030

AMORPHIS on esiintynyt sivuillamme useaan otteeseen aiemmin, mutta 24. helmikuuta 2018 kirjoitettavaa löytyi erityistilaisuuden merkeissä, sillä Musicalypse oli kutsuttu mukaan suomimetallin veteraanien 13:nnen studioalbumin, “Queen of Timen,” ennakkokuunteluun. Edeltävä levy, Under the Red Cloud (2015), sai meiltä lämpimän vastaanoton, joten olimme luonnollisesti innokkaita kuulemaan, minne bändi suuntaisi musiikillisesti sen seuraajalla.

Saavuimme Sonic Pump -studioille kymmenisen minuuttia ennen kello kolmea, jolloin tilaisuuden oli määrä alkaa. Ihailtuamme seinillä roikkuneita kultalevyjä ja kehystettyjä kuvia ja tankattuamme kofeiinipitoisilla juomilla istahdimme huoneeseen, jossa levy soitettaisiin. Tapahtuma alkoi soolokitaristi Esa Holopaisen ja tuottaja Jens Bogrenin pienimuotoisella alustuksella. Bogren kiusoitteli Holopaista siitä, ettei tämä näyttänyt riittävän innokkaalta – “I am excited, but I’m Finnish,” kitaristi puolusteli itseään. Bogren ilmoitti myös, että albumin ilmestyessä sen tekijätiedoista löytyisi runsaasti nimiä, sillä he olivat työskennelleet turkkilaisten muusikoiden, israelilaisen kuoron ja “humalaisen pakistanilaisen huilistin” kanssa. Lopulta koitti kauan odotettu hetki, jolloin play-nappia painettiin.

Alla on muistiinpanoihini pohjautuva analyysi albumin jokaisesta raidasta:

1. “The Bee”

Eteerisellä naislaululla höystetty syntikkaintro johdattelee meidät ajan kuningattaren maailmaan. Delay-kitarariffi muistuttaa hieman “The Wayta”, mutta tässä instrumentit soivat taustalla paljon ponnekkaampina. Muristut itämaiset säkeistöt ovat tyypillistä raskaampaa AMORPHISta, mutta Tomi Joutsenelta kuullaan myös hempeämpää laulantaa. Hieno aloitus!

2. “Message in the Amber”

THE POLICE kirjoitti pullopostia, mutta AMORPHIS luottaa meripihkaan. Folkahtava riffi ja rauhalliset säkeistöt, joissa Tomi Joutsen laulaa kahdessa eri oktaavissa, saavat minut odottamaan biisistä sinkkua “House of Sleepin” ja “Silver Briden” kaltaisten kakkosraitojen tapaan, mutta yhtäkkiä ilmoille kajahtaa öristy kertosäe, ja luuloni osoittautuvat täysin vääriksi. Biisissä kuullaan odottamattomia käännöksiä, mutta tämä on ainoastaan positiivinen asia.

3. “Daughter of Hate”

Progeaika! Yhden biisin aikana AMORPHIS onnistuu tarjoilemaan 7/8-riffin, raa’alla black metal -kärinällä varustetun kertosäkeen, saksofonisoolon ja lämpimästi jammailevan väliosan, jossa sanoittaja Pekka Kainulainen lausuu runoa suomeksi, ynnä muuta – olisi vähättelyä sanoa, että biisissä tapahtuu paljon. Tämä tulee varmasti olemaan yksi suosikeista itselleni – ja miksei muillekin.

4. “The Golden Elk”

Helisevät syntikat ja sanaton naislaulu avaavat kappaleen, joka omaa myös tarttuvan riffin ja ison kertosäkeen. Puolivälissä jouset kasvattelevat draamaa ja kuullaan eksoottisella kielisoittimella soitettu soolo. Ekstrakuriositeettina mainittakoon, että levyn otsikko esiintyy muutamaan otteeseen sanoituksissa. Uskoisin, että tästäkin kappaleesta muodostuu suosittu kuulijoiden keskuudessa.

5. “Wrong Direction”

Alun riffi muistuttaa “Reformationia” “The Beginning of Timesilta” (2011), ja mukana on isoja perkussioita korostamassa soundia. “I should’ve understood / I should’ve seen it coming,” Joutsen laulaa tarttuvassa kertosäkeessä, ja kiehtovassa väliosassa hänen äänensä on ajettu vocoderin tai vastaavan robottimaisen efektin läpi. Ainoastaan lopussa on hieman murahtelua, ja iso outro tuo mieleen NIGHTWISHin “Nemon”. Takuuvarma sinkkubiisi!

6. “Heart of the Giant”

Hauras kitaramelodia hehkuu yksinäistä melankoliaa ennen kuin se tekee tilaa riffille, joka muistuttaa poljennoltaan Alice Cooperin “School’s Outia”, kunnes rummut tulevat mukaan ja tajuan kuulleeni rytmin väärin päässäni. Biisin saa erottumaan joukosta sen kertosäe, jossa Joutsen murahtelee rytmikkäästi ja rankaisevasti. Lopussa hän saa vielä taustatukea kuorolta viedäkseen sanoman perille entistä painokkaammin. Tästä saattaa helposti tulla keikkojen vakiobiisi!

7. “We Accursed”

Kappaleessa on pientä “Escape”-vibaa, ja rehellisesti sanottuna siinä on hieman täyteraidan makua, ainakin edellisiin biiseihin verrattuna. Omaan makuuni tällaisessa rallissa voisi olla enemmänkin puhdasta laulua, sillä se ei ole kovinkaan synkkä tai painostava. Biisistä löytyy kuitenkin kulmikas folk-riffi, joka toistuu useaan otteeseen loppupuolella, ja Santeri Kallion vaikuttavaa kosketinsooloa kannattaa myös pitää silmällä.

8. “Grain of Sand”

Biisi alkaa sitarilla ja rautalankamaisella kitaramelodialla, mutta tätä ei jatku pitkään, sillä luvassa on myös koko levyn hakkaavinta riffittelyä. Mielenkiintoisessa kertosäkeessä puhdas laulu ja örinä vuorottelevat, mikä saa minut pohtimaan, onko odotettavissa Joutsenen ja Koivusaaren duetointia, mikäli biisi päätyy livesoittoon.

9. “Amongst Stars”

Duetoista puheen ollen, tässä sellainen nyt olisi, solisteinaan Joutsen sekä itse Anneke van Giersbergen. Inflaation vaara on aina ilmassa, kun näin tuottelias laulaja tekee paljon vierailuja, mutta onneksi tulokset puhuvat puolestaan, sillä kyseessä saattaa olla jopa koko albumin kirkkain helmi. Musiikillisesti kappale on hieman useimpia biisejä valoisampi, ja lopun kliimaksi on erityisen suurenmoinen.

10. “Pyres on the Coast”

Tomi Joutsenen örinät ensimmäisessä säkeistössä lukeutuvat hänen räkäisiimpinsä ja raaimpiinsa – kenties hän hyödyntää HALLATARen sessioissa oppimiaan kikkoja? Biisissä on paljon vaihtelua, mikä lienee syynä sille, ettei kappale täysin auennut minulle vielä. Lopun riffi, jota vahvistavat orkesteri ja kirkkourut, on kuitenkin asiallinen päätös levylle kaikessa komeudessaan.

Pienen tauon jälkeen saimme kuulla vielä bonusraidat:

11. “As Mountains Crumble”

Itse pääalbumiin verrattuna tällä raidalla on hieman rennompi ja hillitympi 70-luvun tunnelma: löytyy niin valssikomppia, kitarastemmoja ja puhdasta rämpytystä kuin Hammond-urkuja… Biisi on sinänsä miellyttävä, mutta on helppo nähdä, miksi se päätyi leikkaushuoneen lattialle.

12. “Brother and Sister”

Delay-kitarat tuovat säkeistöihin “Alonen” ja “Sky Is Minen” henkeä, kertosäe on tarttuva ja Holopaisen kitarasoolo upea. Hyvä biisi, mutta aivan kuten edellisen kohdalla, on ihan ymmärrettävää miksei tämä mahtunut mukaan, sillä se on tyyliltään melko suoraviivainen ja enemmän aiempien Joutsenen kanssa tehtyjen levyjen linjoilla.

Ensivaikutelmani oli hyvin positiivinen, ja kuulin albumissa itse asiassa jotain samaa kuin “The Beginning of Timesissa”; tosin en niinkään itse musiikissa (vaikka mainitsinkin yllä pari kappaletta kyseiseltä tuotokselta) vaan levyn lähestymistavassa. “TBoT” kurkotteli elokuvallisen ja eeppisen ilmaisun puoleen “Crack in a Stonen” kaltaisilla biiseillä, ja mukana oli niin ikään sinfonisia koskettimia, naislaulua ja erinäisiä ylimääräisiä soittimia, mutta “Queen of Timella” eeppiset elementit on nostettu rohkeasti etualalle ja lopputulos on keskittyneempi, minkä ansiosta albumi tuntuu merkittävältä askeleelta eteenpäin bändin kehityskaaressa. Välittömästi tunnistettava AMORPHIS-resepti on yhä käytössä, mutta sitä on maustettu reilulla kädellä.

On mahdotonta sanoa, kuinka “Queen of Time” pärjää vertailussa AMORPHISin muulle tuotannolle vain yhden kuuntelun perusteella, sillä käsillä on Joutsenen aikaisista levyistä haastavin ja vähiten helposti pureskeltava. Jos jokin AMORPHISin levyistä tarvitsee aikaa avautuakseen kunnolla, niin se on tämä – kuten Bogren varoitti etukäteen, levyssä on paljon sisäistettävää. Jokaisesta biisistä löytyy niin puhdasta kuin öristyä laulua ja moninaisia kerroksia, eikä kovin monia simppeleitä ralleja tai välittömiä hittejä ole löydettävissä, mutta myöhemmät kuuntelut tulevat varmasti olemaan palkitsevia ja paljastamaan huomioimatta jääneitä yksityiskohtia. Joka tapauksessa on kuitenkin selvää, ettei Bogrenin bändille “Under the Red Cloudilla” antama piristysruiske jäänyt yhden levyn ihmeeksi, vaan yhteistyö jatkuu hedelmällisenä.

Recent posts

Related posts

Leave a Reply